Join AMA to protect dermatology’s representation in the House of Medicine

Specialty at risk of losing one-quarter of its current AMA representation

To maintain the Academy’s four delegates and four alternative delegates in the AMA House of Delegates, AAD members need to join the AMA by Dec. 31, 2017. By joining the AMA or renewing your membership, you ensure dermatology’s presence and voice in the house of medicine.

cyndi_yag_howard.jpgBy Cyndi Yag-Howard, MD
Chair of the AMA House of Delegates Dermatology Section Council

The American Medical Association (AMA) is the nation’s largest policy-making body and a collaborative organization comprised of physicians from different specialties throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. There's no other organization in the nation that has such broad physician representation and influence on the future of medicine as the AMA.

Although dermatology is a very small specialty making up less than 2 percent of all physicians in the country, we have very strong representation in AMA through the Dermatology Section Council (DSC), which includes dermatologists representing the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA), the Society for Investigative Dermatology (SID), the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association (ASDSA), the American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS), the American Society of Dermatopathology (ASDP), and dermatologists who represent their state medical societies and the armed services.

The Dermatology Section Council’s leadership role in shaping the AMA’s position on scope of practice is an excellent example of why it is important for dermatology to be involved in the AMA.

Scope of practice is an important issue for dermatology (View the Academy’s Scope of Practice and Truth in Advertising toolkits).

Because of actions taken by your DSC, the AMA adopted a policy for maintaining the authority of medical licensing and regulatory boards to regulate the practice of medicine through oversight of physicians, physician assistants, and related medical personnel. This policy opposes legislative efforts to establish autonomous regulatory boards meant to license, regulate, and discipline physician assistants outside of the existing state medical licensing and regulatory bodies’ authority and purview.

Your DSC was also instrumental in getting a resolution passed that called on the AMA to support drug price transparency legislation requiring pharmaceutical manufacturers to provide public notice before increasing the price of any drug (generic, brand, or specialty) by 10 percent or more each year or per course of treatment and provide justification for the price increase.

The importance of dermatologists joining AMA

The member delegates representing the AMA last year passed a resolution requiring parity between the states and the specialties, meaning that there must be the same number of physician delegates representing the states as there are physician delegates representing the specialties so that the specialties’ interests don't outweigh the states’, and vice versa.

Currently, the Academy has four delegates and four alternate delegates. If we don’t increase our membership in the AMA, we will lose one delegate and one alternate delegate, which equates to one-quarter of our representation in the AMA. That decrease in representation would be a huge loss for dermatology.

Please, help the Academy keep dermatology’s voice strong in medicine and in advocacy. Please join the AMA.

JOIN THE AMA

rubin_adam.jpgYour AMA membership translates into the strongest voice we can have as a specialty in the house of medicine. Regardless of your sub-specialty within dermatology, or if you are in a private practice or academics, your concerns are represented at the national level through the AAD Delegation and the DSC. However, our effectiveness and impact is directly proportional to the number of AAD members who are also AMA members. AAD activity through the AMA is far reaching and has impacts on work value and coding details through the RUC and CPT editorial panel. Join or renew your AMA membership today to support dermatology and make us the most effective we can be in advocating for your concerns at the national level.
—Adam I. Rubin, MD, AAD Alternate Delegate

Scope of practice is an important issue for dermatology (click here for the Academy’s Scope of Practice and Truth in Advertising toolkits).

Directly because of actions taken by your DSC, the AMA adopted a policy for maintaining the authority of medical licensing and regulatory boards to regulate the practice of medicine through oversight of physicians, physician assistants and related medical personnel. This policy opposes legislative efforts to establish autonomous regulatory boards meant to license, regulate, and discipline physician assistants outside of the existing state medical licensing and regulatory bodies’ authority and purview.

Your DSC was also instrumental in getting a resolution passed that called on the AMA to support drug price transparency legislation requiring pharmaceutical manufacturers to provide public notice before increasing the price of any drug (generic, brand, or specialty) by 10% or more each year or per course of treatment and provide justification for the price increase.

The importance of dermatologists joining AMA

The member delegates representing the AMA last year passed a resolution requiring parity between the states and the specialties, meaning that there must be the same number of physician delegates representing the states as there are physician delegates representing the specialties so that the specialties’ interests don't outweigh the states’, and vice versa.

Currently, the Academy has four delegates and four alternate delegates. If we don’t increase our membership in the AMA, we will lose one delegate and one alternate delegate, which equates to one-quarter of our representation in the AMA. That decrease in representation would be a huge loss for dermatology.

Please, help the Academy keep dermatology’s voice strong in medicine and in advocacy. Please join the AMA.

JOIN THE AMA

Klint-Peebles.jpgI first became a member of the AMA as a medical student but took a much more active role as a dermatology resident. The organization has been an invaluable component of my residency education, and it’s difficult for me to imagine my residency without it. My involvement in the DSC allows me to network and collaborate with brilliant minds I wouldn't have met otherwise. In order to advance the needs of our specialty and patients, it is imperative that we take a proactive role within organized medicine, and the AMA allows us to view our specialty within the broader context of the medical community and our current healthcare environment. Only by having an active voice in organizations such as the AMA can we hope to have a seat at the table, create meaningful changes that will enhance our ability to care for our patients, and collaborate with other specialties in a way that will strengthen the impact of dermatology in a broader sense. I think it's easy for many of us to become comfortable in our respective spheres, but interfacing with our colleagues in medicine across the country within the AMA is an incredible opportunity to be positioned at the forefront of healthcare advocacy and policy. Whether it's learning about fascinating, cutting-edge research, working with fellow AMA members on a resolution to create new AMA policy, or debating the most pressing and timely issues of the healthcare landscape, the AMA has something for everyone ---and it is critical that dermatology is clearly heard.
—Klint Peebles, MD, AAD YPS delegate