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Running Your Dermatology Practice During COVID-19

Step 6: Organize your staff


Follow CDC updates and check with your state and local public health departments on regulations concerning group gatherings. Try to limit the number of staff per room in your practice and consider the following guidance:

  1. Educate staff on social distancing in break rooms or lunch areas so they sit at least six feet apart. Staff should wear PPE for office staff meetings or sit at least 6 feet apart.

  2. Instruct staff not to share workstations or computers. If equipment must be shared, staff should be trained on properly cleaning between each use.

  3. Practice social distancing with patients. Train staff to greet patients with a nod, smile, and/or wave. Do not shake hands or hug.

  4. Tell staff not to come into the practice if they exhibit any flu-like illness, loss of taste or smell, other known COVID-19 symptoms, or if they have been in close contact with a COVID-19 infected individual. Staff should follow the CDC’s Return to Work Criteria.

  5. Screen staff each day prior to seeing patients for the presence of flu-like symptoms (cough, fever, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, diarrhea, or shortness of breath), loss of taste or smell, or close contact with individuals who may be infected with COVID-19. Consider non-contact temperature screening (the CDC defines 100.0+degree F as fever). If the screen is positive, consistent with possible COVID-19 infection, or there was close contact with an infected individual, the staff member should be sent home and instructed to follow CDC’s Return to Work Criteria.

  6. Summary of CDC’s Return to Work Criteria

    1. Except for rare situations, a test-based strategy is not recommended to determine when staff should return to work.

    2. The CDC defines health care worker close contact as being within about 6 feet of an infected person for 15 minutes or more while not wearing recommended PPE. If staff wear PPE throughout the workday and socially distance at other times, they would not be considered at high risk of exposing their co-workers/patients or of being exposed to COVID-19 by them.

    3. Staff with mild to moderate symptoms should not go to work and should self-isolate for 10 days from symptom onset and at least 24 hours fever-free without fever-reducing medication with other symptoms improved. Staff who were suspected of having COVID-19 and had it ruled out based on a clinical decision that COVID-19 is not suspected and testing is not indicated should be able to return to work (without other suspected or confirmed diagnoses).

    4. If a physician evaluating a symptomatic staff member for COVID-19 decides that antigen testing is indicated and the test is negative, that would indicate that the staff member likely did not have active COVID-19 infection at the time the sample was collected. A second antigen test may be performed at the discretion of the evaluating physician, particularly when a higher level of clinical suspicion for COVID-19 infection exists. Staff who were suspected of having COVID-19 and had it ruled out with at least one negative test should be able to return to work (without other suspected or confirmed diagnoses).

    5. Staff with severe or critical illness should not go to work and should isolate for 20 days from symptom onset and at least 24 hours fever-free without fever-reducing medication with other symptoms improved.

    6. Staff that had close contact with a COVID-19 infected individual should not go to work and self-quarantine for 14 days. If symptoms develop, follow the symptomatic health care worker algorithm above.

    7. Asymptomatic staff who decided to get a COVID-19 test and the test came back as positive should not go to work and should self-quarantine for 14 days. If symptoms develop, follow the symptomatic health care worker algorithm above.

    8. Check with your local and state health department for any additional requirements for management of staff that are suspected of having COVID-19.

  7. The CDC has created guidance regarding how to handle health care personnel who may have been exposed to COVID-19. The AAD has also assembled information about the status of risks to personnel in health care facilities (PDF download) and will be updating it frequently. OSHA has also provided guidance on how to keep practices safe during a pandemic (PDF download).

  8. If findings suggest the possibility of COVID-19 infection, consider referring staff to their primary care physician or local urgent care center for evaluation.

  9. Follow HIPAA protocols if staff are diagnosed with COVID-19. You may inform patients and staff they have encountered someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, however you cannot identify the staff without their consent.

  10. Be flexible and accommodating with staff whenever possible. Childcare and schooling options may be limited during this time.

  11. Make sure you communicate all new procedures with staff in advance of any changes/updates to your office procedures.

  12. Check with your state’s requirements on employee travel. Some state and local governments require people who have recently traveled to certain high COVID-19 prevalence areas to quarantine for 14 days.

  13. Understand the employment-related legal considerations during the pandemic by reviewing the following Dermatology World articles:

    1. Employment-related legal considerations during the COVID-19 public health crisis

    2. Employment-related legal considerations during COVID-19, Part II

    3. COVID-19 impact on employed dermatologists: Part 1

    4. COVID-19 impact on employed dermatologists: Part 2

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